Fugitive surrenders to New York police after a decade on the run


The Associated Press

NEW YORK- After evading authorities for nearly a decade, a fugitive featured almost a dozen times on "America's Most Wanted" walked into a police precinct and turned himself in, saying it was "the right thing to do."

Chaka Raysor, 37, has been profiled at least 11 times on "America's Most Wanted" and was pegged as one of the show's "Dirty Dozen," a roster of the fugitives most sought after by the show's host, John Walsh.

"I missed my life and I missed my kids," Raysor said after leaving Federal District Court in Brooklyn on Monday, where he pleaded not guilty to murder, drug trafficking and racketeering charges filed against him in September 1996.

"It's the right thing to do," Raysor said, when asked why he surrendered. "I'm tired of living that lifestyle."

Raysor turned himself in at the 79th Precinct on Sunday evening, police spokesman Detective John Sweeney said.

He was accused with brother Umeme of heading the Raysor Organization, a notorious drug operation that earned more than $4 million in drug profits, prosecutors said. The organization's operations ultimately extended to Virginia, North Carolina and Delaware, according to the indictment.

Umeme Raysor was convicted on murder charges and sentenced to life in prison, while Chaka Raysor disappeared.

Chaka Raysor was denied bail Monday without any objection from his lawyer. If convicted, he could be sentenced to life without parole.

After leaving court, Raysor said he never saw himself profiled on television, but heard about it from a neighbor.

The "America's Most Wanted" Web site listed his possible locations as North Carolina and Pennsylvania, but when asked where he had been over the years, he said, simply, "in Brooklyn."

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