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Police Grants Article

April 11, 2008

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Michael Paddock Law Enforcement Grants
with Michael Paddock

Homeland security funding remains robust for 2008

In a reflection of its continued status as a national priority homeland security funding increased for the sixth straight year under the 2008 fiscal year appropriations bill.

WASHINGTON, D.C., January 23, 2008—In a reflection of its continued status as a national priority and a still-expanding investment, homeland security funding increased for the sixth straight year under the 2008 fiscal year appropriations bill signed by President George Bush on Dec. 26, 2007.

The $38.7 billion DHS budget for fiscal 2008, up roughly 9 percent more than fiscal 2007 (including emergency funds to beef up the US Border Patrol), provides increases for a wide variety of homeland security programs.

In its final bill, Congress boosted homeland security grant spending to $4.1 billion, $1.8 billion above the initial request and $693 million above 2007. Port Security Grants were funded at $400 million, $190 million above 2007, among other programs that strengthen cargo screening, explosives detection and border security.


Click here to read the full article on HSToday.us

About the author

Michael Paddock serves both as Chief Executive Officer of Grants Office, a national grant development services firm, and as Grants Columnist for the award-winning HSToday magazine. In his role at Grants Office, Mr. Paddock consults with dozens of state and local governments and international agencies on homeland security funding. He contributes regularly to a wide range of publications, and he is a featured speaker at many national conferences specializing in homeland security. Mr. Paddock served from 1996-2001 on the US Interagency Electronic Grants Committee and co-founded the New York State E-grants Project in 1999. His article “Funding the First 72 Hours” was recently accepted as a reference within the National Blueprint for Secure Communities, a joint project of the National Council on Readiness and Preparedness and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.