Make this page my home page
  1. Drag the home icon in this panel and drop it onto the "house icon" in the tool bar for the browser

  2. Select "Yes" from the popup window and you're done!

August 21, 2013

Print Comment

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor in Chief 10-43: Be Advised...
with Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor in Chief

Doing 10 minutes of training a day

Who wouldn’t want to get a week of cost-free training every year?

Making the rounds on email in the past several weeks has been a pair of publications put out by the U.S. Fire Administration on the “10 Common Indicators of Deception” (yes, I sometimes read fire service training materials — please don’t hate).

Those 10 deception indicators are well known to cops — for a nice little refresher, check out part one here and part two here — but the specific content of the two PDFs is not the central point of today’s discussion. 

The title of the series under which these two documents were produced — Coffee Break Training — immediately reminded me of sage advice from my friend and PoliceOne colleague Brian Willis that I thought would be useful to pass along in this space.

10-Minute Training
I first heard Willis talk about the concept of 10-minute training during a seminar he presented at Southeast Regional Warrior Symposium back in early 2012. He repeated at this year’s ILEETA Conference in April. 

I’ll paraphrase him, because although I don’t have my notes from either conference readily available at this moment, his fundamental message affects my daily thoughts and deeds. 

Do 10 minutes of training a day, every day you work the job. 

Doesn’t sound like a lot, but it is. 

Assuming you work a four-day week, and you do 10 minutes of training each day you work, you will have done 40 minutes of training per week. Easy math, right?

Assuming you have four weeks off (vacations, holidays, etc.), leaving you with 48 work weeks in a year, and you do the prescribed 10 daily minutes, you will have done 1,920 minutes of training annually. 

That’s 32 hours of training. 

Every year. 

For FREE. 

Someone might ask, “What kind of training can I do in ten minutes?”

Belay the jokes please, but, “What CAN’T you do in ten minutes?”

Solo, Pairs, and Groups
If you’re by yourself, ensure that your duty weapon is clear and you’re in a safe environment. You can practice draws, dry-fire skills, malfunction clears (using snap caps / dummy rounds), as well as de-escalation / re-holster techniques.   

Or you could simply close your eyes and do visualizations and positive self-talk that sharpen your mindset before hitting the streets. 

If you’ve got a training partner to work with, you can practice your handcuffing skills, or do a few repetitions of some non-contact (or low-impact) DT drills. 

Or you could simply talk with each other about incidents in the news, or do when-then planning for known trouble spots in your patrol area. 

One last thing: In addition to doing my own personal 10-minute training, I use Brian’s advice every day throughout the commission of my job as Editor in Chief of PoliceOne. 

Just about everything you read on PoliceOne will take no more than five minutes of your time. Same is true for watching our video tactical tips. 

This is not an accident, nor is it a coincidence. This is so you can “consume” that content and still have five minutes to think about it by yourself, discuss it with your patrol partner, or share it with everyone on your shift at lineup / roll call. 

So the next time you’re thinking about taking a ten-minute coffee break, I suggest you grab a bit (or a bite?) of training to go along with it. 

Stay safe, my friends.

About the author

Doug Wyllie is Editor in Chief of PoliceOne, responsible for setting the editorial direction of the website and managing the planned editorial features by our roster of expert writers. An award-winning columnist — he is the 2014 Western Publishing Association "Maggie Award" winner in the category of Best Regularly Featured Digital Edition Column — Doug has authored more than 800 feature articles and tactical tips on a wide range of topics and trends that affect the law enforcement community. Doug is a member of International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA), an Associate Member of the California Peace Officers' Association (CPOA), and a member of the Public Safety Writers Association (PSWA). Even in his "spare" time, he is active in his support for the law enforcement community, contributing his time and talents toward police-related charitable events as well as participating in force-on-force training, search-and-rescue training, and other scenario-based training designed to prepare cops for the fight they face every day on the street.

Read more articles by PoliceOne Editor in Chief Doug Wyllie by clicking here.

Contact Doug Wyllie




PoliceOne Columnists:

PoliceOne's team of expert writers provides our readers with valuable insight from both on-the-job and classroom experience.

To submit articles or become a columnist click here and include your background/CV and a sample of your writing.

All Columnists

PoliceOne Newsletter

Week-717-September-22-2014
Week-716-September-19-2014-B
Subscribe Now

Today's Top Stories

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
All of Today's News

Discuss The News

PoliceOne News and Current Events Forum More Forums

Officer Down

All Officer Downs Submit an Officer Down

Featured Columnist

Loraine Burger
Perspectives on Policing
with Loraine Burger