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The power of presumption

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July 15, 2005

The power of presumption

 
Submitted by:
Chuck Remsberg & Scott Buhrmaster, PoliceOne Editorial Staff

In his book, “Blue Blood,” NYPD Detective Edward Conlon suggests using presumptive wording when talking with suspects as a way to get to the truth faster. As an example, if you’re entering a suspect’s house, don’t ask, “Do you have a gun in the house?” In the mind of a perp the answer may realistically be no if he’s just holding a gun for a friend. If it’s not his, it’s not there. Instead, Conlon suggests, ask, “Where is the gun?” This presumption presentation saves time and lets the perp know that you’re alert and fully expecting that he’s got a weapon. “The quality of information you get is only as good as you demand,” writes Conlon.





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