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Interrogation

Interrogation

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Columns

How cops can use the 1-2-3 Approach to secure a confession Louis C. Senese - Interrogation Themes

How cops can use the 1-2-3 Approach to secure a confession

Asking a series of three hypothetical questions many times will result in obtaining the initial admissions of guilt to the commission of a crime - Full Story

Columns

2 more great interrogation techniques: The John Bowden - On Language, Communication, and Leadership

2 more great interrogation techniques: The "lying child" and the "logical approach"

People do not like to be pushed — they like to be involved in the process, and by their involvement, we can lead them to a confession - Full Story

Exclusives

How this one interview technique can beat lying suspects

How this one interview technique can beat lying suspects

Subjects seeking to be deceptive overwhelmingly prefer closed-ended questions that let them get by with abbreviated statements whereas truthful individuals will mine their memories for the truth - Full Story

Columns

How to get more suspect confessions by being a ‘car salesman’ John Bowden - On Language, Communication, and Leadership

How to get more suspect confessions by being a ‘car salesman’

A physical trigger can be all it takes to convince a suspect to tell us their story - Full Story

Columns

Why you should care about NY court's ruling on police deception Val Van Brocklin - Cop Gumbo

Why you should care about NY court's ruling on police deception

If courts across the land can’t agree, how is the average cop supposed to know what’s okay? - Full Story

Columns

Case law on police deception Val Van Brocklin - Cop Gumbo

Case law on police deception

In some ways, the law is unclear on what police deception is legal (or not). However, despite the co... - Full Story

News

NY court: Some police interrogation lies considered coercion

Police can lie when interrogating suspects, but when the lies become "patently coercive," any confession cannot be used as evidence - Full Story

Columns

An interrogator's mindset: Louis C. Senese - Interrogation Themes

An interrogator's mindset: "It's not personal. It's business."

As John Reid told me, “A good interrogator is a good actor” — you have to convince the suspect that you’re on his side - Full Story

Columns

4 creative 'tricks' to keep you safe on patrol Marty Katz - Past the Uniform

4 creative 'tricks' to keep you safe on patrol

There are so many tricks of the trade to defuse street encounters and advance investigations — what are yours? - Full Story

Videos

Fact-Finding in Sexual Assault Investigations

In a sexual assault investigation the law enforcement investigator’s mental approach should be to determine if a crime was or wasn’t committed. One of the major aspects of determining if a crime was committed and by whom, is understanding if the fact-finding investigative process which is reasonable, logical, and common sensical was applied. Sexual assault investigations are complex and any tool the law enforcement investigator can take from his/her toolbox i.e. the fact-finding investigative process, will assist the investigator in determining if a crime did or didn’t take place should be utilized. The investigator must then follow the fact-finding investigative process, protocols, and procedures in order to properly and lawfully determine what the witnesses and sexual offender have to offer in investigating the sexual assault allegation. The investigator’s credibility as a law enforcement officer will be questioned if the fact-finding investigative process is not properly and lawfully applied. If the credibility and reliability of the application of the fact-finding investigative process is questionable then a sexual offender may be released back into the community and/or an innocent person can be sent to jail/prison for a crime he/she didn’t commit. In this video Lawrence W. Daly, Chief Sexual Assault Investigative Educator for the One Daly Corporation raises several issues surrounding the concerns of utilizing the fact-finding investigative process in a sexual assault investigation.



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