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Another resignation from New Hampshire department


November 21, 2000
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Another resignation from New Hampshire department

(DUNBARTON, N.H.) -- Another employee has resigned from the Dunbarton Police Department. Deborah Andrews, secretary of the department, resigned effective Nov. 16.

Andrews is the daughter-in-law of retiring Police Chief Donald R. Andrews. Her resignation coincides with that of the chief and a part-time police officer.

The board of selectmen accepted her resignation with much regret last night during a meeting.

The board has not made any decisions concerning an interim or permanent replacement for outgoing Chief Andrews. However, the board met last night in secret session with remaining police officers to discuss personnel matters.

"We're meeting with our remaining police officers to discuss personnel issues that they may have and to talk about the future of the department," said Selectmen Chairman Mert Mann.

The Board of Selectmen unanimously accepted Dunbarton Police Chief Andrews' notice of retirement on Oct. 19.

In addition to the chief's retirement, the town accepted the resignations of three other police officers last month, bringing the total number of in-service police officers down to two or three part-time officers.

On Oct. 23, part-time officer Ernie Holm handed in his resignation effective on Nov. 16. Holm, who opposes an independent evaluation of the Dunbarton Police Department as proposed by the board of selectmen earlier last month, scheduled his last day of employment to correspond with that of the retiring chief.

On Oct. 5, part-time officer Patrick Payette resigned from the police department during a selectmen's meeting, due to a difference of opinion with the board.

On Oct. 1, Dunbarton's only full-time police officer, Timothy Locke, resigned his position to accept a job with the Bow Police Department.

The rash of police resignations began shortly after the board of selectmen discussed the possibility of hiring an independent consulting firm to evaluate the police department.

(iSyndicate; The Union Leader; Nov. 10, 2000). Terms and Conditions: Copyright(c) 2000 LEXIS-NEXIS, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights Reserved.




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