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Gonzales: Attacks in London and Egypt appear to be al-Qaida


July 24, 2005
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Gonzales: Attacks in London and Egypt appear to be al-Qaida

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON- The recent terrorist attacks in London and Egypt appear to be the work of al-Qaida, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales said Sunday.

Gonzales said that although there have been no specific threats against the United States, U.S. officials are concerned that there could be similar attacks here.

"We know we have an enemy that's very patient and very diabolical," Gonzales said on "Late Edition" on CNN.

"We know even though there hasn't been an attack since 9-11 here in this country that we have an enemy that's still intent on doing harm to the United States and its interests. And we're doing everything we can do to protect Americans from another attack," he said.

Gonzales said that "appearances seem to indicate that it is al-Qaida." But he cautioned that the investigations are still in the early stages and no definitive conclusions have been made.

At least 88 people were killed in three bomb blasts early Saturday in Sharm el-Sheik, Egypt.

London was hit Thursday by a second wave of bomb attacks on its mass transit system. Unlike the July 7 attacks that killed 56 in London, no one was injured in Thursday's botched strikes.

Gonzales said U.S. authorities, particularly the FBI, are cooperating with the foreign investigations and trying to prevent another attack.

"We are offering our assistance to both the Egyptian and the British authorities and doing everything we can to find out the causes of these attacks and who is ultimately responsible," Gonzales said on "Fox News Sunday."

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