10/07/2011

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor in Chief10-43: Be Advised...
with Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor in Chief

Can you help NY cops crack the Gilgo Beach case?

Detective Thomas Sergeant Groneman of the Suffolk County Police Department Homicide Squad is asking for investigators across the country to study and consider the provided details as they may relate to one open cases

In recent weeks, I’ve been in phone and email contact with a couple of law enforcers from the Suffolk County Police Department. A while back, I had offered to assist them in any way I could as they continue to probe the multiple murders which have occurred in their Long Island jurisdiction during the past decade or so.

Late yesterday, I spoke with Detective Sergeant Thomas Groneman of the SCPD Homicide Squad, and received from him some images which were recently released to local media in New York, but probably have not made their way around the country (until now). I have already passed this information along to my contacts at National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs). Regular readers will recall that NamUs is a free online database of missing and unidentified persons which can be searched by medical examiners, coroners, law enforcement officials, and the general public. 

However much I think the NamUs can be useful in solving these these kinds of cases, I believe that PoliceOne Members are the most likely to have have the invaluable professional insight for cracking this one. If any of the following images (or related information) spurs a thought which could prove useful, you can contact Detective Sergeant Groneman by simply clicking here.

The Victims
To date, the remains of ten people have been found along Ocean Parkway — eight women, one man (dressed as a female), and one female toddler — in and around Gilgo Beach. Five of the eight women have been positively identified — all were working as prostitutes at the time of their murders. However, because identifying remains of this nature is a pain-staking, time-consuming process, the remains of several victims continue to be unidentified.

“Jane Doe number six, whose head, hands, and right foot were recovered along Ocean Parkway on April 4th of this year, was linked by DNA to a torso discovered in Manorville on November 19th, 2000. We’ve determined that these remains are of a young, Caucasian female, between 18 to 35 years old, approximately five feet, two inches tall. She would have last been seen alive in the late summer or fall of 2000, and based on what we know of some of the other victims, believe she may have been working as a prostitute,” Groneman told me.

Groneman said also that the remains of a female toddler — age between 16 and 32 months — was discovered approximately 250 feet away from Jane Doe number six, there is no known connection between the two.

“However, through DNA analysis, the investigation has determined that this child is related to the female whose remains were discovered by the New York State Police approximately seven miles away in Nassau County on April 11th. Although we cannot definitively say, it is likely that these two individuals are mother and child,” Groneman said.

Jewelry was discovered on both of these victims — the toddler had a set of hoop earrings and a rope chain necklace while the older female relative had two bracelets. Below the artist’s sketches are detailed photos of the jewelry.

The unidentified Asian male, who is estimated to be between the ages of 17 and 23 years old at the time of his death, is approximately five feet, six inches tall and had poor dental health, missing both top and bottom molars and one of his top front teeth. Investigators have determined that he was wearing women’s clothing when his body was found. We are providing our forensic artist’s rendition of what this individual may have looked like.

Forensic anthropologists estimate his death occurred at least five years ago and could have occurred as far back as 10 years ago.

The Images
“We’re hopeful that the release of this additional information will aid in our investigation by helping us identify the unknown victims and their killer or killers. We are asking for investigators across the country to study and consider the provided details as they may relate to one of their open cases,” Groneman told me yesterday.

Once again, if any of the above information or images below lead you to want to contact Detective Sergeant Groneman, you can simply email him directly by clicking here.

Map of the Area

Suffolk County Police Department
Photo by Suffolk County Police Department
Please Click here if you have information which could help the Suffolk County Police Department Homicide Squad.

 

Unidentified Female

Suffolk County Police Department
Photo by Suffolk County Police Department
Please Click here if you have information which could help the Suffolk County Police Department Homicide Squad.

 

Unidentified Male

Suffolk County Police Department
Photo by Suffolk County Police Department
Please Click here if you have information which could help the Suffolk County Police Department Homicide Squad.

 

Jewelry Found (1)

Suffolk County Police Department
Photo by Suffolk County Police Department
Please Click here if you have information which could help the Suffolk County Police Department Homicide Squad.

 

Jewelry Found (2)

Suffolk County Police Department
Photo by Suffolk County Police Department
Please Click here if you have information which could help the Suffolk County Police Department Homicide Squad.

About the author

Doug Wyllie is Editor in Chief of PoliceOne, responsible for setting the editorial direction of the website and managing the planned editorial features by our roster of expert writers. An award-winning columnist — he is the 2014 Western Publishing Association "Maggie Award" winner in the category of Best Regularly Featured Digital Edition Column — Doug has authored more than 800 feature articles and tactical tips on a wide range of topics and trends that affect the law enforcement community. Doug is a member of International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA), an Associate Member of the California Peace Officers' Association (CPOA), and a member of the Public Safety Writers Association (PSWA). Even in his "spare" time, he is active in his support for the law enforcement community, contributing his time and talents toward police-related charitable events as well as participating in force-on-force training, search-and-rescue training, and other scenario-based training designed to prepare cops for the fight they face every day on the street.

Read more articles by PoliceOne Editor in Chief Doug Wyllie by clicking here.

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