03/16/2012

Parts of UC pepper-spray report to remain sealed

Sections that police have argued would violate privacy if released will stay sealed

Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — A judge says parts of a highly anticipated report on the pepper-spraying of student demonstrators by University of California, Davis police will remain under seal.

The Oakland Tribune reports Alameda County Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo ruled Friday that University of California officials can release most of their report on the incident.

But sections that police have argued would violate their privacy if released will stay sealed while the officers' arguments are taken into consideration.

University attorneys said they had not decided whether to release a partial version of the report.

The investigation led by a former California Supreme Court judge was spurred by an officer dousing a row of protesters with pepper spray as they sat passively. Video of the incident drew worldwide attention and became a rallying point for the Occupy movement.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

A judge is set to hear arguments over the release of a highly anticipated report on the pepper-spraying of student demonstrators by campus police at the University of California, Davis.

The police action gained widespread attention after a viral online video showed an officer dousing a row of protesters with pepper spray as they sat passively.

The hearing scheduled for Friday morning in Alameda County Superior Court comes after Judge Evelio Grillo indicated in a tentative ruling Thursday his intent to allow the release of the report.

A UC Davis task force investigating the Nov. 18 crackdown on Occupy protesters was scheduled to publish its findings last week. But it delayed its release after learning the police officers' union planned to ask a judge to temporarily block its release, which Grillo did last week.

The union wants the university to remove officers' names and personnel information. UC attorneys argue the state law protecting officers' information doesn't apply.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press

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