My Police Heroes: The 8-foot-tall patrolman and the cop's cop

Gene Tinnin and Gary Ozment gave me different qualities to aspire to


Editor’s Note:

Editor’s Note: Here, Joel Shults writes about the two Police Heroes who made him want to be a cop. We want your story too. As a kid, did you idolize a fictional character on TV or was there a hometown cop you looked up to? Send us your short stories (and pictures too, if you have them) about your Police Hero — the cop who inspires you in your life as a law enforcer. By entering your story, you’ll be eligible to win a VIEVU LE2 Body Worn Video Camera, or one of five prize packs. Entries are being accepted now through Friday, July 26 — click here for more details.

Heroic characters were often defined and introduced to me by my hero dad. He was a low-level, white-shirted, black-frame-bespectacled government clerk who was a country-bred hard worker on our land in the woods. 

He was a World War II veteran who personified "God-and-Country" values. If he admired someone, it was a foregone conclusion that I would mirror his judgment. 

He tutored me, unknowingly, in defining heroes.

Gene Tinnin and Gary Ozment
One of those was Gene Tinnin of the Missouri State Highway Patrol. MSHP was (and is) a legendary law enforcement agency. Gene was a faithful member of our church, so I got to see him often. Whether in his flawless uniform or in a suit, he seemed eight feet tall. 

He had a booming voice that made the stories of him jumping from airplanes in Dad’s war and being shot on duty — saved by the leather cartridge holder on his belt — very believable and, in fact, inevitable. 

As much as I admired cops real and fictional, none persuaded me to consider actually being a cop. At that time in history, police work was decidedly blue collar. Discussions about law enforcement being a profession were just beginning. 

I knew my parents expected me to be the first in my family to go to college; cops and college just didn't make sense then. Nevertheless, I did a ride-along with a local policeman because my friend’s father was the mayor of my small town, and I got invited to hop in one of these nights just for the heck of it. 

I might as well have snorted cocaine that night for the addictive power of that experience.

So Rich a Crown
When I sat in that police car for the first time, there were no computer terminals or other 21st century equipment, just a cackling radio and a panel with a few rocker switches. 

Driving was Gary Ozment, a veteran officer. The universe of midnight shift under flashing red lights revealed itself to me. The town that I thought I knew was teeming with potential badness and Ozment had his finger on its pulse. 

He saw things that went unnoticed to my civilian eye. Every block and alley reminded him of a story to tell. His experiences reminded me of a phrase in a favorite hymn: 

“Did e’er such love and sorrow meet, or thorns compose so rich a crown.”

Life through this old cop’s eyes was the bittersweet of action, evil, and opportunity to do the right thing in the middle of it all. 

Two Among Many
These two foundational characters, influential as they were, are just two of hundreds of men and women whose paths have crossed mine and, like fingerprints, left evidence of being there along the way. 

The most remarkable thing is that I’m sure that neither of them knew their influence, any more than the hundreds of decent, flawed humans who have shaped my life since. 

But whenever I do the right thing, their pebble in the water ripples on.

Click here to enter your own story about the officer who made you want to become a cop. 

About the author

Joel Shults operates Street Smart Training and is the founder of the National Center for Police Advocacy.. He is retired as Chief of Police for Adams State University in Colorado. Over his 30 year career in uniformed law enforcement and in criminal justice education Joel has served in a variety of roles: academy instructor, police chaplain, deputy coroner, investigator, community relations officer, college professor, and police chief, among others. Shults earned his doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis from the University of Missouri, with a graduate degree in Public Services Administration and bachelors in Criminal Justice Administration from the University of Central Missouri. In addition to service with the US Army military police and CID, Shults has done observational studies with over fifty police agencies across the country. He has served on a number of advisory and advocacy boards including the Colorado POST curriculum committee as a subject matter expert.

Follow Joel on Twitter @ChiefShults.

Contact Joel Shults

Recommended Police Heroes

Join the discussion