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Police Technology Press Release

October 30, 2007

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American Company’s High Tech Surveillance Device Wins Both Asian and U.S. Electronics Design Award

New Crime Fighting Tool Turns Cops into Video Cameras: It looks like a common police shoulder mic, but a hidden camera captures crime as it happens

Spanish Fork, Utah — EHS, Inc., a Utah based law enforcement equipment company, has been awarded the Global Sources Electronics Design Award for its innovative new product called the VIDMIC.  The award was presented October 12th at a gala event held at the Hong Kong Hyatt.  The event  kicked off the 2007 China Electronics Fair; one of the world’s largest electronics trade shows.

Just two days later, the VIDMIC was again recognized as the most innovative communications product of 2007.  This time the event was Cygnus Law Enforcement Group’s Innovation Awards; held annually in conjunction with the opening of the International Chiefs of Police show.

The VIDMIC is a revolutionary data acquisition system which goes everywhere the police officer wearing it goes and records important information at anytime.  A full color digital video recorder, still photo camera, and digital audio recorder are all housed in a fully operational shoulder mic.  Because officers already use shoulder mics, there is no need for them to add additional equipment to their already overburden utility belts in order to have video and audio recording capabilities.

In- car video recorders, already widely used by police, have been shown to increase the likelihood of successful prosecution, protect officers and agencies from false allegations and frivolous law suits.  At the same time, video enhances officer safety, training, performance, and professionalism. 

But in-car video can’t go with the officer up to the door, inside the apartment, into the backyard, or down a narrow alley.  It can’t prove the officer had permission to search a house, had just cause to pull a weapon at the end of a chase, and did, in fact, Mirandize the suspect.  The VIDMIC can.

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The VIDMIC was introduced to the public safety market four months ago in July, 2007.  Currently 120 police departments across the country have deployed the units.  Many more are testing VIDMICS. 

While some question the “Big Brother” aspects of such pervasive police surveillance, most citizen’s see the benefits to police work as outweighing any privacy issues.