8 ways you can be a great police warrior

Your job as a warrior is to have more positive attributes than negative


We know there are certain labels you don’t want to have hung on you by your fellow officers — there are 6 types of police warrior you don’t want to be. They are negative warriors. 

On the opposite side of that coin, though, there are labels we strive to have — monikers we’re proud to bear. Many of these are dependent on our personal focus on the job, or are incumbent with our team or assignment we’ve been selected for. 

What kind of warrior are you? Maybe you’re defined by a personal attribute that helps you do your job a little better than those around you. Here are eight types of positive warrior.

1. Drug Interdiction Warrior: Your special talent is getting drugs off the street — the larger the quantity, the better.

2. SWAT, SRT, ERT Warrior: You get all the latest gear (all the cool toys), an awesome uniform and training others don’t. You also get called to those situations beyond the capacity of patrol to handle.

3. K-9 Warrior: You get an awesome uniform and a furry, panting partner to track and chase down bad guys.

4. D.A.R.E. Warrior: Yeah, you get called ‘Kiddie Cop’ and worse, but you are there interacting with the little ones and doing your best to influence them in a positive way. You provide protection for our most precious resource, our children.

5. Communication Warrior: You have the gift of gab, professional speech, and the ability to gain compliance through your use of words. With you on scene others know that the situation will probably resolve itself peacefully.

6. DWI Warrior: You do your best each shift to locate and identify impaired drivers and try to keep the streets and highways safe for the motoring public. You can almost smell an impaired driver a block away.

7. Interview/Interrogation Warrior: Like the Communication Warrior, you use your words and understanding of human psychology to get statements, information and confessions that others might miss.

8. Super Warrior: You are a “cop’s cop” — you have the total package, a blend of all the attributes that are needed and wanted in the modern law enforcement officer. You are the rarest and most coveted of the warriors.

Conclusion
These are just a few of the positive warriors that we are surrounded by in a given day. You can probably come up with a few other of your own, but the important question is, “What kind of warrior are you?”

With hard work, dedication and desire you can be a positive warrior like those listed above. Conversely, with very little effort, you can quickly become one of those negative warriors.

In a lot of cases, the negative warriors — those outlined here — don’t even know they’re so negative. In some cases, the same goes for the positive warriors. Both need someone to point it out to them, so that it can be fixed or enhanced. From there it becomes a choice. What kind of warrior are you willing to be? What are the things that you need to accomplish it? What have you done to accomplish it?  What else needs to be done?

A positive warrior sets goals, seeks out opportunities and training. A negative warrior waits and wonders why good things don’t happen. A positive warrior sees failure as an opportunity to learn and grow. A negative warrior sees failure as defeat and quits trying.

What will your legacy be? What kind of warrior will you be?

About the author

In February 2014, Duane Wolfe retired from his career as a Minnesota Peace Officer after more than 25 years of service (beginning in 1988). During his career he served as patrolman, sergeant, S.R.T., Use of Force and Firearms Instructor, and is currently employed by the Parkers Prairie Police Department. He is also a full time instructor in the Law Enforcement Program at Alexandria Technical College, Alexandria, Minnesota. Duane has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice from Bemidji State University, and a Masters Degree in Education from Southwest State University. Duance has previously published articles on Calibre Press and IALEFI and served on the Advisory Board for Lt. Col. Dave Grossmans book, On Combat. Contact Duane Wolfe

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