Make this page my home page
  1. Drag the home icon in this panel and drop it onto the "house icon" in the tool bar for the browser

  2. Select "Yes" from the popup window and you're done!

August 14, 2012
PrintCommentRSS

Video: Ark. police reconstruct handcuffed shooting

A reconstruction video demonstrates how a suspect with his hands cuffed behind his back could have fatally shot himself

By Chuck Bartels
Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark.  — Police in Arkansas released a video reconstruction Tuesday meant to show how a 21-year-old man who was handcuffed behind his back could have shot himself in the head while in the backseat of a patrol car.

In the video, an officer played the part of Chavis Carter, a Southaven, Miss., man who died from a gunshot wound to the temple on July 28 despite being frisked twice by Jonesboro police officers. Carter was black and both of the officers who arrested him are white, a dynamic that has generated suspicion among some members of the city's black community.

The officers stopped a truck in which Carter was riding after they received a report of a suspicious vehicle driving up and down a residential street. They arrested Carter after learning he had an outstanding arrest warrant related to a drug charge in Mississippi. Police also alleged Carter had marijuana.

In producing the video, the agency used the same type of handcuffs that were used on Carter and the same model of handgun found with Carter after he died, a .380-caliber Cobra semi-automatic. An officer of similar height and weight to Carter — 5 feet 8 inches, 160 pounds — sat in the back of a cruiser, leaned over and was able to lift the weapon to his head and reach the trigger.

"We just wanted to get a good perspective on how it could be done and the ease with which it could be done," said Jonesboro Police Chief Michael Yates.

As far as how Carter concealed the gun, Yates said it's possible he hid it in the patrol car after officers first frisked him. He was then in the car unhandcuffed until officers eventually decided to arrest him. They then conducted a more thorough search of Carter.

"It's obvious they did miss the weapon on the first search. It is likely, since he was placed into the car unhandcuffed the first time, that he had an opportunity to stash the weapon in the car," Yates said. "The second search, which was more thorough and inclusive, did not disclose the weapon either."

The incident and the subsequent investigation has prompted criticisms of the Jonesboro Police Department. Several critics came to a Monday night meeting about the department's reaccreditation.

George C. Grant, retired dean of the library at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, asked that the reaccreditation be put on hold until the investigation into Carter's death is complete, The Jonesboro Sun reported. Grant and others also complained that Yates hasn't pushed to hire minorities. Only three of 145 members of the police force are black, the Sun reported.

Yates didn't offer a timetable for when the internal police probe would be complete. He said he's waiting for an autopsy report, a report from the state Crime Laboratory on the gun and details on Carter's phone records.

Russell Marlin, a Memphis, Tenn.-based attorney representing Carter's family, said Tuesday that he's conducting his own investigation. Martin said it was too early to give his own assessment of how Carter died, but he said Carter wasn't suicidal. Martin said he would make a statement once his inquiry is complete.

"By all accounts, he was a healthy, happy guy. There's no reason to think he would have killed himself," Martin said.

Meanwhile, the FBI is monitoring the case. The state and local branches of the NAACP have asked the Justice Department to investigate. Craighead County NAACP Branch President Perry Jackson didn't return a phone message seeking comment.

Prosecutor Scott Ellington, who will review the investigative file to determine whether any charges are warranted, said he didn't expect to receive anything before the end of the week.

Police say video and audio recordings, as well as statements from witnesses, show neither officer pulled his weapon nor fired a shot during the traffic stop. Police have refused to release those recordings, citing the investigation.

Yates said other agencies have contacted him and told of similar incidents that occurred over the years.

Less than two weeks after Carter was shot, a man shot himself in the torso while handcuffed in the back of a patrol car in Mobile, Ala. The man survived. Police who searched him found two knives but missed the gun.

Charles Ellis, a training supervisor at the Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy in East Camden, wouldn't offer an opinion on what happened in Jonesboro. But he said both the initial pat down and the post-arrest search should reveal any weapons.

Associated PressCopyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

After a pat down and once a person is under arrest, "an officer can go in and search inside the pockets and inside the shoes, any place anything may be hidden on a person," Ellis said.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press






PoliceOne Offers

P1 on Facebook

Connect with PoliceOne

Mobile Apps Facebook Twitter Google

Get the #1 Police eNewsletter

Police Newsletter Sign up for our FREE email roundup of the top news, tips columns, videos and more, sent 3 times weekly
See Sample