logo for print

High Stress, Low Glamor: Correctional Officers Struggle with Workplace Strains


By DAVID CRARY
AP National Writer

WEST SENECA, N.Y. - The commute takes about 40 minutes, from the notoriously tough state prison at Attica to Mike Verrastro's pool-and-patio-equipped home in this middle-class Buffalo suburb. Two different worlds, but the veteran correctional officer ruefully acknowledges the difficulty keeping them separate.

He sometimes catches himself yelling at his 12-year-old son in the tone he uses to berate inmates. Even at the dinner table, he occasionally speaks the crude language of the cellblocks. One incident, in which an HIV-positive inmate spat a mouthful of blood into his face, caused months of anxiety for him and his wife.

"People say you've got to leave your job at work - it sounds good, but it's not easy," Verrastro said. "A lot of times I yell and scream, and my kids look at me like I'm nuts."























































































Related Story: Statistics on the Job of Correctional Officer

___

One the Net:

New York correctional officers union: http://www.nyscopba.org

Federal information: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos156.htm

Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Copyright Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Recommended for you

Join the discussion

Health - Physical and Mental Fitness

Sponsored by

Copyright © 2017 PoliceOne.com. All rights reserved.