2 more great interrogation techniques: The "lying child" and the "logical approach"

People do not like to be pushed — they like to be involved in the process, and by their involvement, we can lead them to a confession


Editor’s Note: John Bowden’s book “Interview to Confession, The Art of the Gentle Interrogation” goes into great detail on the use of nonverbal communications in interviews, investigations, and interrogations. It is available on Amazon.com and on our website APTACTraining.com.

In the interrogation we are asking our subjects to share with us their side of the story. Some interrogators try the frontal approach. “You did it, we have witnesses, we have prints, we have DNA, we have hairs, and we have footprints. You might as well confess!” 

I call this the overwhelming evidence approach. People do not like to be pushed — they like to be involved in the process, and by their involvement, we can lead them to a confession.

As you present your investigation, have the subject acknowledge what you have said. You will be leading him to share his story. With each step you present, have him acknowledge it. You do not need him to agree with you, you only need their acknowledgement. 

The Logical Approach
The introduction sets the stage. 

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