logo for print

Video: Nanomaterial can stop a speeding bullet

Researchers were able to shoot tiny glass beads at the material, which effectively stopped bullets in their paths


ABC News

HOUSTON — Researchers at a Rice University lab are researching technology that that could potentially stop a 9-millimeter bullet and seal the entryway behind it — an advance that may have huge implications for ballistic protection for soldiers, as well as other uses.

During tests, the researchers were able to shoot tiny glass beads at the material, which effectively stopped bullets in their paths. "This would be a great ballistic windshield material," scientist Ned Thomas said in a clip posted on the university's website.

The group, which included scientist Thomas, Rice research scientist Jae-Hwang Lee and a team from MIT's Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, was looking for ways to make materials "more impervious to deformation or failure." The result would be better, stronger, lighter armor for soldiers and police, and protection for sensitive materials subject to small, fast moving objects, such as aircraft and satellites.

Full story: Nanomaterial Can Stop a Speeding Bullet, Strengthen Soldiers’ Body Armor

Request product info from top Police Apparel companies

Thank You!

Thank You!

By submitting your information, you agree to be contacted by the selected vendor(s).

Join the discussion

Brand focus

Sponsored content
5 things you need to know to prevent heatstroke

5 things you need to know to prevent heatstroke

Protect yourself against heat-related illness on the job by recognizing the risks and taking a few basic precautions

Copyright © 2017 PoliceOne.com. All rights reserved.