ACLU says LPRs 'cross the line'

Mapping drivers' whereabouts with cruiser-mounted scanners draws scrutiny


By O'Ryan Johnson
The Boston Herald

BOSTON — Civil libertarians are raising the alarm over the state's plans to create a Big Brother database that could map drivers' whereabouts with police cruiser-mounted scanners that capture thousands of license plates per hour - storing that information indefinitely where local cops, staties, feds and prosecutors could access it as they choose.

'What kind of a society are we creating here?' asked civil rights lawyer Harvey Silverglate, who along with the ACLU fears police abuse. 'There comes a point where the surveillance is so pervasive and total that it's a misnomer to call a society free any longer.'

LexisNexis Copyright © 2013 LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.   
Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy

Full story: ACLU says LPRs 'cross the line'

Request product info from top Police License Plate Readers companies

Thank You!

= required Error occured while sending data

By submitting your information, you agree to be contacted by the selected vendor(s).

Join the discussion

Brand focus

Sponsored content
Beyond rolling stolens: 4 ways to develop investigative leads using LPR data

Beyond rolling stolens: 4 ways to develop investigative leads using LPR data

License plate reader data can reveal patterns that provide actionable intelligence for investigators

logo for print