LEO Near Miss initiative aims to improve officer safety

Officers often share their near misses with their close friends, but rarely are these stories, and the lessons learned from them, shared with officers across the country


Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) Near Miss is a voluntary, non-disciplinary officer safety initiative that allows law enforcement personnel to read about and anonymously share stories of close calls or “near misses,” which provide lessons learned that can protect fellow officers in similar situations.

What is a near miss?

A near miss is defined as any incident that could have resulted in a law enforcement officer being seriously injured or killed if not for a fortunate break in the chain of events.

Near misses often include contributing factors like hazardous conditions, subjects with concealed weapons and failed equipment. (Photo/PoliceOne)
Near misses often include contributing factors like hazardous conditions, subjects with concealed weapons and failed equipment. (Photo/PoliceOne)

Near misses often include contributing factors like hazardous conditions, subjects with concealed weapons, failed equipment, or lapses in situational awareness. Regardless of the situation, they provide lessons learned, and reporting a near miss allows fellow officers to learn from these incidents so they can go home to their loved ones after every shift.

Officers often share their near misses with their close friends, but rarely are these stories, and the lessons learned from them, shared with officers across the country.

Peer learning to improve officer safety

LEO Near Miss is strictly for promoting peer learning and enhancing officer safety and wellness. Officers can visit LEOnearmiss.org or download the free smartphone app (LEO Near Miss), read the lessons learned from near misses experienced by other officers and anonymously share their own near-miss experiences.

Near-miss stories submitted to LEO Near Miss go directly to the Police Foundation, an independent, non-profit research and training organization that manages the system in partnership with other organizations like Below 100, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and the National Tactical Officers Association.

Each story received undergoes a two-stage review by current and former law enforcement to remove all personally identifying information (ensuring anonymity when published) and to highlight important takeaways for improving officer safety.

Once a story has finished the review process (about 7-10 days), any personally identifying information is permanently deleted from our records, and the story is made available for vetted law enforcement personnel to read on the LEO Near Miss website and smartphone app. Furthermore, no IP addresses are ever tracked and linked to any stories submitted to the system, and officers do not need to log in to submit a story.

How to submit your near miss

Please support this critical officer safety initiative by reading and sharing the near-miss stories and lessons learned that your fellow officers have shared, and please consider sharing your own near-miss experiences at LEOnearmiss.org or through our free smartphone app. The five minutes you take to share your story can improve future policy and training and could save the life of a brother or sister in blue.

Request product info from top Police Training companies

Thank You!

Thank You!

By submitting your information, you agree to be contacted by the selected vendor(s).

Join the discussion

Brand Focus

Sponsored content
Axon offers free tools to help departments recruit and retain officers

Axon offers free tools to help departments recruit and retain officers

Axon unveils the ‘I'm In’ Recruiting Campaign, which offers departments free marketing tools to help recruit and retain LEOs

Copyright © 2018 PoliceOne.com. All rights reserved.