Retired police as force multipliers: The LEOSA effect

Retired police officers can be force multipliers when it comes to protecting communities


By Jeremy Nikolow, alumnus, Criminal Justice, American Military University and Anthony Galante, Faculty Member, Criminal Justice, AMU

On November 9, 2015, a retired Jacksonville, Florida Sheriff’s Deputy Michael Kellam made national headlines by helping catch a bank robber, David Duong. After witnessing the robbery from the drive-through teller line, Kellam chased Duong into a nearby neighborhood, catching and beginning to grapple with him. As Duong reached for a gun, Kellam drew his own gun and shot Duong several times, leading to Duong’s capture. Kellam’s training and experience helped apprehend an armed and dangerous felon.

Stories like this demonstrate that retired police officers can be a huge asset in helping to protect the public. Fortunately, Kellam was able to recognize the in-progress robbery and his protector mindset kicked in to apprehend the suspect.

The Value of Retired Police
Retired police officers can be force multipliers when it comes to protecting communities. To enable them to continue using their training and experience, federal legislation exists to allow retired officers to carry concealed firearms almost anywhere in the United States. Let’s examine the legislation that gives Kellam, and most other retired police officers, the right to carry a concealed firearm.

​Full Story: Retired police as force multipliers: The LEOSA effect

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